Spinal Cord Injuries

An estimated 291,000 persons live with a spinal cord injury (SCI), with roughly 17,730 new cases occurring each year(1). Current research and treatments focus on reducing the “secondary injury cascade” that begins immediately after the initial spinal cord trauma(2). This cascade occurs during either the sub-acute (weeks to months after initial injury) or chronic phase (months to years after initial injury), or during both (3). The severity of this secondary damage directly impacts further bodily damage and the restorative process. Fortunately, research has shown a correlation between reduced secondary damage and improved neurological outcomes(4, 5). Therapies that can reduce the severity of the secondary injury cascade, such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy, have the potential to reduce the cellular damage that occurs post-injury, and therefore improve neurological outcomes.

 

Extivita Therapies for Spinal Cord Injuries:

Spinal Cord Injuries

An estimated 291,000 persons live with a spinal cord injury (SCI), with roughly 17,730 new cases occurring each year(1). Current research and treatments focus on reducing the “secondary injury cascade” that begins immediately after the initial spinal cord trauma(2). This cascade occurs during either the sub-acute (weeks to months after initial injury) or chronic phase (months to years after initial injury), or during both (3). The severity of this secondary damage directly impacts further bodily damage and the restorative process. Fortunately, research has shown a correlation between reduced secondary damage and improved neurological outcomes(4, 5). Therapies that can reduce the severity of the secondary injury cascade, such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy, have the potential to reduce the cellular damage that occurs post-injury, and therefore improve neurological outcomes.

 

Extivita Therapies for Spinal Cord Injuries:

Extivita Therapies Spinal Cord Injury Recovery:

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Neurofeedback for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

Neurofeedback

Supplements for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

Supplements

Nutritional IV Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

Nutritional IV Therapy

Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy (PEMF) for Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy

Listen to
Ryley’s experience with
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy
to treat his
Spinal Cord Injury

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT):

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy - Chapel Hill

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) increases oxygen to the damaged spinal cord tissue, thereby decreasing the cell death and damage that can occur for weeks to months after initial injury (6, 7). Additionally, HBOT decreases spinal cord edema (swelling) and inflammation(3) and has been shown to reduce synaptic and dendritic degeneration in animal models(8).

 

Synaptic and dendritic degeneration refers to the degradation of connections between nerve cells, which are essential for healthy neurological function. Reducing such degeneration via HBOT may preserve connections in the spinal cord and brain and thus decrease the severity of neurological impairment. Check out our “Testimonials” page to hear about one of our patient’s experience receiving HBOT for spinal cord injury.

 

HBOT Research Shows Improvement To:

  • Reduces cell death
  • Reduces inflammation and swelling
  • Reduces oxidative stress

Effects of HBOT on Spinal Cord Injury:

Decreases Inflammation

Decreased Inflammation

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy reduces systemic inflammation by increasing anti-inflammatory gene expression and decreasing proinflammatory genes.

Grows New Blood Vessels

New Blood Vessel Formation

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy stimulates the formation of new blood vessels, healing injured tissues that were unable to get nutrients and oxygen.

Increases Stem Cell Production

Increased Stem Cell Activity

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy mobilizes stem progenitor cells (SPCs) from the bone marrow, creating the opportunity for tissue regeneration.

Neurofeedback Therapy in Durham, NC

Neurofeedback:

The brain has been shown to have remarkable capacity to form and reorganize synaptic connections (neuroplasticity) and recovery even in severe chronic stroke. Neurofeedback can facilitate neuroplasticity and enhance motor learning, control, memory, and cognitive function (6-7).

 

Learn more about Neurofeedback…

IV Therapy:

Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is an important antioxidant molecule in the body and the brain. Ascorbate (reduced form of vitamin C) scavenges free radicals, recycles other antioxidants, protects brain cells from cell damage/death. Ascorbate has been associated with neuroprotection pre- stroke, in acute stage of (and reperfusion stage), and in chronic phases of stroke (8-10). In addition, we also offer B12 with our Vitamin C infusions. B12 has been shown to enhance nerve repair (11).

 

Learn more about IV Therapy…

Nutritional IV Therapy in Durham, NC

Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy (PEMF) in Durham, NC

Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Therapy (PEMF):

Micro vessels play a big role in overall course of vascular diseases. Dysfunction to this system has been linked to a multitude of illnesses. The PEMF device has been shown to optimize the microcirculatory system, increasing perfusion to tissues and organs. When used in conjunction with HBOT, oxygen rich blood can be delivered to these areas, where healing can begin (12).

 

Learn more about PEMF Therapy…

Recent Spinal Cord Injury News & Research:

Evaluation of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for spinal cord injury in rats with different treatment course using diffusion tensor imaging.

Animal study. To evaluate the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats with different treatment course using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Hospital in Fuzhou, China. Fifty adult Sprague-Dawley rats were grouped as: (A) sham-operated group (n = 10); (B) SCI without HBO therapy group (n = 10); (C) SCI with HBO therapy for 2 weeks (SCI+HBO) group (n = 10); (D) SCI with HBO therapy for 4 weeks (SCI+HBO) group (n = 10); (E) SCI with HBO therapy for 6 weeks (SCI+HBO) group (n = 10). Basso Beattie Bresnahan (BBB) scores and diffusion tensor imaging parameters including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), radial diffusion (RD), and axial diffusion (AD) values in the injury epicenter, as well as 2 mm rostral and caudal to the injury epicenter were collected and analyzed 6 weeks post-injury.

read more

Effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on HMGB1/NF-κB expression and prognosis of acute spinal cord injury: A randomized clinical trial.

Effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on HMGB1/NF-κB expression and prognosis of acute spinal cord injury: A randomized clinical trial.

Although there are reports of the beneficial effects of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy in experimental settings, there are few clinical trials of HBO therapy for acute spinal cord injury (SCI). We investigated the effect of HBO in acute SCI by measuring plasma high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) levels, and by monitoring changes in electromyogram F-persistence (the percentage of discernible F-waves) and F-chronodispersion (the difference between minimal and maximal latency).

read more

References
  1. “Home Page – NSCISC Application.” Accessed June 19, 2019. https://www.nscisc.uab.edu/.
  2. “Spinal Cord Injury Information: Levels, Causes, Recovery.” Accessed June 19, 2019. https://www.shepherd.org/patient-programs/spinal-cord-injury/about#FAQ3.
  3. Oyinbo, Charles Aidemise. “Secondary Injury Mechanisms in Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: A Nugget of This Multiply Cascade.” Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis 71, no. 2 (2011): 281–99. https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/8131/2216495186e1d35f6958c59587714efca557.pdf
  4. Dumont, R. J., D. O. Okonkwo, S. Verma, R. J. Hurlbert, P. T. Boulos, D. B. Ellegala, and A. S. Dumont. “Acute Spinal Cord Injury, Part I: Pathophysiologic Mechanisms.” Clinical Neuropharmacology 24, no. 5 (October 2001): 254–64. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11586110
  5. Kwon, Brian K., Wolfram Tetzlaff, Jonathan N. Grauer, John Beiner, and Alexander R. Vaccaro. “Pathophysiology and Pharmacologic Treatment of Acute Spinal Cord Injury.” The Spine Journal 4, no. 4 (July 1, 2004): 451–64. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.spinee.2003.07.007
  6. Kelly, D. L., K. R. Lassiter, A. Vongsvivut, and J. M. Smith. “Effects of Hyperbaric Oxygenation and Tissue Oxygen Studies in Experimental Paraplegia.” Journal of Neurosurgery 36, no. 4 (April 1972): 425–29. https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.1972.36.4.0425.
  7. Emery, E., P. Aldana, M. B. Bunge, W. Puckett, A. Srinivasan, R. W. Keane, J. Bethea, and A. D. Levi. “Apoptosis after Traumatic Human Spinal Cord Injury.” Journal of Neurosurgery 89, no. 6 (December 1998): 911–20. https://doi.org/10.3171/jns.1998.89.6.0911.
  8. Ying, Xinwang, Wenzhan Tu, Sisi Li, Qiaoyun Wu, Xiaolong Chen, Ye Zhou, Jie Hu, Guanhu Yang, and Songhe Jiang. “Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Reduces Apoptosis and Dendritic/Synaptic Degeneration via the BDNF/TrkB Signaling Pathways in SCI Rats.” Life Sciences 229 (July 15, 2019): 187–99. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lfs.2019.05.029.