Abstract:

A brain injury results in a temporary or permanent impairment of cognitive, emotional, and/or physical function. Predicting the outcome of pediatric brain injury is difficult. Prognostic instruments are not precise enough to reliably predict individual patient’s mortality and long-term functional status. The purpose of this article is to provide a guide to the strengths and limitations of the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in treating pediatric patients with severe brain injury. We studied total 56 patients of head injury. Out of them 28 received HBOT. Only cases with severe head injury [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) < 8] with no other associated injury were included in the study group. After an initial period of resuscitation and conservative management (10-12 days), all were subjected to three sessions of HBOT at 1-week interval. This study group was compared with a control group of similar severity of head injury (GCS < 8). The study and control groups were compared in terms of duration of hospitalization, GCS, disability reduction,and social behavior. Patients who received HBOT were significantly better than the control group on all the parameters with decreased hospital stay, better GCS, and drastic reduction in disability. In children with traumatic brain injury, the addition of HBOT significantly improved outcome and quality of life and reduced the risk of complications. Prakash, Parelkar, Oak, Gupta, Sanghvi, Bachani, Patil, , (2012). Role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in severe head injury in children.¬†Journal of pediatric neurosciences, 2012 Jan;7(1):4-8.¬†https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22837768