Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for postoperative ischemic bronchitis after resection of lung cancer.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has been used successfully in the treatment of specific ischemic injuries, but has been a little evaluated specifically in postoperative ischemic bronchitis (POIB). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of HBOT when used for POIB after resection of lung cancer. From January 1999 to December 2016, 1,100 patients underwent lymph node dissection (LND) and either anatomic pulmonary resection or lung resection with bronchoplasty for lung cancer. POIB was diagnosed by bronchoscopy. HBOT was administered after POIB was diagnosed. HBOT comprised one 60-minute session daily in the hyperbaric chamber at 2.0 absolute atmospheres with 100% oxygen.

Hyperbaric oxygen combined with 5-aminolevulinic acid photodynamic therapy inhibited human squamous cell proliferation.

he photodynamic therapy (PDT) depends on the presence of molecular oxygen. Thus, the efficiency of PDT is limited in anoxic regions of tumor tissue and vascular shutdown. It is reported the use of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) may enhance the efficiency of PDT. However, there are rarely studies about utilizing HBO plus PDT for treatment with human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Therefore, this study aimed to investigate and compare the therapeutic effect of combined therapy and PDT alone treatment. Multiple cellular and molecular biology techniques were used in the current study such as CCK-8, western blotting, flow cytometry, MDC staining and immunofluorescence assay.

Progressive resistance training to prevent arm lymphedema in the first year after breast cancer surgery: Results of a randomized controlled trial.

Existing research suggests that progressive resistance training (PRT) after breast cancer (BC) surgery is safe, but the preventive effect on arm lymphedema has yet to be determined. Women aged 18 to 75 years who were undergoing BC surgery with axillary lymph node dissection were eligible for the study. Recruited on the day of surgery, participants were allocated to intervention or usual care by computer randomization. The intervention consisted of PRT 3 times per week: in the first 20 weeks as a supervised group exercise and in the last 30 weeks as a self-administered exercise. The primary outcome was arm lymphedema, which was defined as a >3% increase in the interlimb volume difference by water displacement.