Full Spectrum Infrared Sauna

Infrared sauna therapy makes healing relaxing, comfortable, and safe. By increasing your body temperature with infrared light, our sauna helps improve your cardiovascular health, relieve body pains, detoxify, and so much more!

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Why Infrared Sauna?

There are countless benefits to infrared (IR) sauna therapy including detoxification, decreased inflammation, increased metabolism, and more! These effects can help improve many chronic conditions as well as symptoms of acute health concerns. Not only does IR sauna therapy improve specific health issues, but it also has immediate relief of day-to-day stress and body aches/pains. So, whether you’re looking for a supplemental therapy for a chronic condition, relief from stress and body pains, or simply a way to detox and relax, IR sauna therapy is for you.

Relaxing Infrared Sauna

Incredibly relaxing, safe therapy with few common side effects

Full Spectrum Infrared Sauna

State of the art, full-spectrum infrared sauna

Infrared Sauna Detoxification

Helps improve circulation, decrease inflammation, detoxify, and more!

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    Who can Infrared Sauna Help?

    Infrared saunas can help relieve the symptoms of many health conditions, acute concerns, and general feelings of wellbeing and relaxation.

    • Arthritis(16)
    • Cardiovascular Disease(20-24)
    • Chronic Pain(18-19)
    • Diabetes(17)
    • Exercise Recovery(29-30)
    • Fibromyalgia(34-35)
    • Lyme’s Disease(36)
    • Neurological Disease(27-28)
    • Obesity(15)
    • Respiratory Disease(25-26)
    • Skin Concerns (pigmentation/aging)(31-33)
    Full Spectrum Infrared Sauna RTP, NC

    How does Infrared Sauna Therapy Work?

    You’re probably familiar with traditional saunas if you’ve ever been to a spa or wellness retreat. While traditional saunas can have great stress-relieving benefits, infrared saunas are another type of sauna that can make an even greater impact on your health.

    When you are in an infrared sauna, the light energy which it emits increases your body temperature and causes it to enter a state of thermal stress(1). This thermal stress results in number of physiological changes including increased heart rate and blood flow, decreased blood pressure, increased metabolism, muscle relaxation, and release of beneficial hormones(2-7). Such changes can have immediate relief of stress and body aches, as well as improve many of the systems that are impaired in disease.

    Our Infrared Sauna

    At Extivita, we use a state-of-the-art full spectrum infrared sauna boasting the lowest and safest EMF and ELF levers of any infrared sauna on the market. While many saunas only use far-infrared wavelengths, ours delivers near-infrared (IR-A), mid-infrared (IR-B) and far-infrared (IR-C) light. By emitting the full infrared spectrum, our sauna penetrates not only the outermost layer of the skin (the epidermis), but the deeper layer of the skin (the dermis) as well(8). Additionally, our sauna delivers over 25 times the power of the nearest clinic’s, allowing for the deepest tissue penetration and optimal health benefits.

    What are the Benefits of Infrared Sauna?

    While the effects depend on the patient, condition being treated, number and frequency of of treatments. Patients who have received infrared sauna have experienced the following benefits in as little as 10 sessions.

    • Detoxification(9-11)
    • Decreased Inflammation(12-13)
    • Increased Circulation(5, 14)
    • Increased Metabolism(5)
    • Decreased Blood Pressure(1)

    Frequently Asked Questions About Infrared Sauna

    How long are infrared sauna sessions? 
    A typical sauna session will last anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour from check-in to check-out. All patients must start at 20 minutes unless there are special circumstances. Most patients will be in the sauna for 25-40 minutes, although the session time varies depending on one’s condition and tolerance of the sauna itself.  
    Are infrared saunas like traditional steam saunas? 
    No, they are different! Infrared light heats the body, not the surrounding air, so it is more comfortable and allows you to enjoy a longer session than with traditional steam saunas.   
    What are the benefits of infrared saunas? 
    Infrared saunas help rid your body of toxins, decrease stress and body pains, and can help improve a number of health conditions.
    How should I prepare for my infrared sauna experience? 
    Because infrared saunas increase sweating, you want to make sure to rehydrate! Please come to each session well-hydrated, not hungover or after drinking alcohol. Drinking water is available in the sauna room.   
    Who cannot use the infrared sauna? 
    Infrared sauna use is not recommended for people who are pregnant, children under 12, those who cannot handle temperature extremes, those with hemophilia, fever, insensitivity to heat, and those under the influence of alcohol or who abuse alcohol. 
    What can I do in the infrared sauna? 
    During your session, we recommend sitting back and enjoying the relaxing atmosphere that a sauna creates. Feel free to take advantage of the sauna’s Bluetooth speakers if you would like to enjoy music during your session. Due to the high heat and the sweating which it causes, we do not allow any items inside the sauna.  
    What do I do before and after my sauna session? 
    We require all patients to rinse off both before and after their sauna session. There is a shower in the sauna room, as well as towels provided for your use. Feel free to bring your own body and face wash.  
    What do I wear inside the infrared sauna? 
    During your sauna session, feel free to wear a bathing suit, or go in nude. We place towels on all areas of contact in the sauna, and all surfaces are cleaned between use.  

    Recent Infrared Sauna News & Research

    References:
    1. Crinnion, Walter J. “Sauna as a Valuable Clinical Tool for Cardiovascular, Autoimmune, Toxicant- Induced and Other Chronic Health Problems.” Environmental Medicine, 2011, p. 11.
    2. Schieke, Stefan M., et al. “Cutaneous Effects of Infrared Radiation: From Clinical Observations to Molecular Response Mechanisms.” Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine, vol. 19, no. 5, Oct. 2003, pp. 228–34. PubMed, doi:10.1034/j.1600-0781.2003.00054.x.
    3. Kauppinen, K. “Sauna, Shower, and Ice Water Immersion. Physiological Responses to Brief Exposures to Heat, Cool, and Cold. Part I. Body Fluid Balance.” Arctic Medical Research, vol. 48, no. 2, Apr. 1989, pp. 55–63.
    4. Kukkonen-Harjula, K., et al. “Haemodynamic and Hormonal Responses to Heat Exposure in a Finnish Sauna Bath.” European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, vol. 58, no. 5, 1989, pp. 543–50. PubMed, doi:10.1007/BF02330710.
    5. Vuori, I. “Sauna Bather’s Circulation.” Annals of Clinical Research, vol. 20, no. 4, 1988, pp. 249–56.
    6. Hasan, J., et al. “Special Review. I. Physiological Effects of Extreme Heat as Studied in the Finnish ‘Sauna’ Bath.” American Journal of Physical Medicine, vol. 45, no. 6, Dec. 1966, pp. 296-314 contd.
    7. Kauppinen, K., et al. “Some Endocrine Responses to Sauna, Shower and Ice Water Immersion.” Arctic Medical Research, vol. 48, no. 3, July 1989, pp. 131–39.
    8. Cho, Soyun, et al. “Effects of Infrared Radiation and Heat on Human Skin Aging in Vivo.” Journal of Investigative Dermatology Symposium Proceedings, vol. 14, no. 1, Aug. 2009, pp. 15–19. ScienceDirect, doi:10.1038/jidsymp.2009.7.
    9. Sears, Margaret E., et al. “Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury in Sweat: A Systematic Review.” Journal of Environmental and Public Health, vol. 2012, 2012. PubMed Central, doi:10.1155/2012/184745.
    10. Ross, Gerald H., and Marie C. Sternquist. “Methamphetamine Exposure and Chronic Illness in Police Officers: Significant Improvement with Sauna-Based Detoxification Therapy.” Toxicology and Industrial Health, vol. 28, no. 8, Sept. 2012, pp. 758–68. PubMed, doi:10.1177/0748233711425070.
    11. Hüppe, Michael, et al. Treatment of Patients Burdened with Lipophilic Toxicants: A Randomized Controlled Trial. no. 3, 2009, p. 9.
    12. Laukkanen, Jari A., and Tanjaniina Laukkanen. “Sauna Bathing and Systemic Inflammation.” European Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 33, no. 3, Mar. 2018, pp. 351–53. Springer Link, doi:10.1007/s10654-017-0335-y.
    13. Kunutsor, Setor K., et al. “Longitudinal Associations of Sauna Bathing with Inflammation and Oxidative Stress: The KIHD Prospective Cohort Study.” Annals of Medicine, vol. 50, no. 5, Taylor & Francis, July 2018, pp. 437–42. Taylor and Francis+NEJM, doi:10.1080/07853890.2018.1489143.
    14. Yu, Shi-Yau, et al. “Biological Effect of Far-Infrared Therapy on Increasing Skin Microcirculation in Rats.” Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine, vol. 22, no. 2, Apr. 2006, pp. 78–86. PubMed, doi:10.1111/j.1600-0781.2006.00208.x.
    15. Biro, Sadatoshi, et al. “Clinical Implications of Thermal Therapy in Lifestyle-Related Diseases.” Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 228, no. 10, Nov. 2003, pp. 1245–49. DOI.org (Crossref), doi:10.1177/153537020322801023.
    16. Oosterveld, Fredrikus G. J., et al. “Infrared Sauna in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis. A Pilot Study Showing Good Tolerance, Short-Term Improvement of Pain and Stiffness, and a Trend towards Long-Term Beneficial Effects.” Clinical Rheumatology, vol. 28, no. 1, Jan. 2009, pp. 29–34. PubMed, doi:10.1007/s10067-008-0977-y.
    17. Beever, Richard. “Do Far-Infrared Saunas Have Cardiovascular Benefits in People with Type 2 Diabetes?” Canadian Journal of Diabetes, vol. 34, no. 2, Jan. 2010, pp. 113–18. ScienceDirect, doi:10.1016/S1499-2671(10)42007-9.
    18. Masuda, Akinori, et al. “The Effects of Repeated Thermal Therapy for Patients with Chronic Pain.” Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, vol. 74, no. 5, 2005, pp. 288–94. PubMed, doi:10.1159/000086319.
    19. Gale, George D., et al. “Infrared Therapy for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.” Pain Research and Management, vol. 11, no. 3, 2006, pp. 193–96. DOI.org (Crossref), doi:10.1155/2006/876920.
    20. Beever, Richard. “Far-Infrared Saunas for Treatment of Cardiovascular Risk Factors.” Canadian Family Physician, vol. 55, no. 7, July 2009, pp. 691–96.
    21. Kihara, Takashi, Sadatoshi Biro, Yoshiyuki Ikeda, et al. “Effects of Repeated Sauna Treatment on Ventricular Arrhythmias in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.” Circulation Journal: Official Journal of the Japanese Circulation Society, vol. 68, no. 12, Dec. 2004, pp. 1146–51. PubMed, doi:10.1253/circj.68.1146.
    22. Kihara, Takashi, Sadatoshi Biro, Masakazu Imamura, et al. “Repeated Sauna Treatment Improves Vascular Endothelial and Cardiac Function in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.” Journal of the American College of Cardiology, vol. 39, no. 5, Mar. 2002, pp. 754–59. PubMed, doi:10.1016/s0735-1097(01)01824-1.
    23. Kihara, Takashi, Masaaki Miyata, et al. “Waon Therapy Improves the Prognosis of Patients with Chronic Heart Failure.” Journal of Cardiology, vol. 53, no. 2, Apr. 2009, pp. 214–18. PubMed, doi:10.1016/j.jjcc.2008.11.005.
    24. Miyata, Masaaki, et al. “Beneficial Effects of Waon Therapy on Patients with Chronic Heart Failure: Results of a Prospective Multicenter Study.” Journal of Cardiology, vol. 52, no. 2, Oct. 2008, pp. 79–85. PubMed, doi:10.1016/j.jjcc.2008.07.009.
    25. Kikuchi, Hiroshi, et al. “Effect of Repeated Waon Therapy on Exercise Tolerance and Pulmonary Function in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Pilot Controlled Clinical Trial.” International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, vol. 9, Dec. 2013, pp. 9–15. PubMed Central, doi:10.2147/COPD.S50860.
    26. Umehara, Megumi, et al. “Repeated Waon Therapy Improves Pulmonary Hypertension during Exercise in Patients with Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.” Journal of Cardiology, vol. 51, no. 2, Elsevier, Apr. 2008, pp. 106–13. www.journal-of-cardiology.com, doi:10.1016/j.jjcc.2008.01.004.
    27. Johnstone, Daniel M., et al. “Turning On Lights to Stop Neurodegeneration: The Potential of Near Infrared Light Therapy in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease.” Frontiers in Neuroscience, vol. 9, 2015, p. 500. PubMed, doi:10.3389/fnins.2015.00500.
    28. Laukkanen, Tanjaniina, et al. “Sauna Bathing Is Inversely Associated with Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease in Middle-Aged Finnish Men.” Age and Ageing, vol. 46, no. 2, Mar. 2017, pp. 245–49. Silverchair, doi:10.1093/ageing/afw212.
    29. Mero, Antti, et al. “Effects of Far-Infrared Sauna Bathing on Recovery from Strength and Endurance Training Sessions in Men.” SpringerPlus, vol. 4, July 2015. PubMed Central, doi:10.1186/s40064-015-1093-5.
    30. Noponen, Perttu, et al. “Effects of Far Infrared Heat on Recovery in Power Athletes.” Journal of Athletic Enhancement, vol. 04, Jan. 2015. ResearchGate, doi:10.4172/2324-9080.1000202.
    31. Lee, Ju Hee, et al. “Effects of Infrared Radiation on Skin Photo-Aging and Pigmentation.” Yonsei Medical Journal, vol. 47, no. 4, Aug. 2006, pp. 485–90. PubMed Central, doi:10.3349/ymj.2006.47.4.485.
    32. Tanaka, Yohei, et al. “Long-Term Evaluation of Collagen and Elastin Following Infrared (1100 to 1800 Nm) Irradiation.” Journal of Drugs in Dermatology: JDD, vol. 8, no. 8, Aug. 2009, pp. 708–12.
    33. —. “Objective Assessment of Skin Rejuvenation Using Near-Infrared 1064-Nm Neodymium: YAG Laser in Asians.” Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology, vol. 4, July 2011, pp. 123–30. PubMed Central, doi:10.2147/CCID.S22841.
    34. Matsumoto, Shuji, et al. “Effects of Thermal Therapy Combining Sauna Therapy and Underwater Exercise in Patients with Fibromyalgia.” Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, vol. 17, no. 3, Aug. 2011, pp. 162–66. ScienceDirect, doi:10.1016/j.ctcp.2010.08.004.
    35. Matsushita, Kakushi, et al. “Efficacy of Waon Therapy for Fibromyalgia.” Internal Medicine (Tokyo, Japan), vol. 47, no. 16, 2008, pp. 1473–76. PubMed, doi:10.2169/internalmedicine.47.1054.
    36. Saunas and Lyme Disease – Ozone, FIR, Steam, Dry Heat. https://lymebook.com/sauna-for-lyme-disease.htm. Accessed 1 Apr. 2021.